New Non-Fiction: Wednesday, March 23

The Macedon Public Library is fully open for in-person visits. Computers are available and the Discovery Room is also open. Masks are strongly encouraged for all patrons, even if you have been vaccinated. We will continue to offer “Grab and Go” services for those who prefer to place their books on hold online and then pick them up in the cabinet outside the library.

Here are a few of the new books that have come in to the library recently. We invite you to check them out!

The Invisible Kingdom: Reimagining Chronic Illness

A silent epidemic of chronic illnesses afflicts tens of millions of Americans: these are diseases that are poorly understood, frequently marginalized, and can go undiagnosed and unrecognized altogether. Renowned writer Meghan O’Rourke delivers a revelatory investigation into this elusive category of “invisible” illness that encompasses autoimmune diseases, post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome, and now long COVID. O’Rourke traces the history of Western definitions of illness, and reveals how inherited ideas of cause, diagnosis, and treatment have led us to ignore a host of hard-to-understand medical conditions, ones that resist easy description or simple cures.

How to Be Perfect: The Correct Answer to Every Moral Question

From the creator of The Good Place and the cocreator of Parks and Recreation, a hilarious, thought-provoking guide to living an ethical life, drawing on 2,400 years of deep thinking from around the world. Most people think of themselves as “good,” but it’s not always easy to determine what’s “good” or “bad”—especially in a world filled with complicated choices and pitfalls and booby traps and bad advice. Fortunately, many smart philosophers have been pondering this conundrum for millennia and they have guidance for us. With bright wit and deep insight, How to Be Perfect explains concepts like deontology, utilitarianism, existentialism, ubuntu, and more so we can sound cool at parties and become better people.

Black American Refugee: Escaping the Narcissism of the American Dream

In the early ’90s, young Tiffanie Drayton left Trinidad and Tobago to join their mother in New Jersey, where she’d been making her way as a domestic worker. At first, life in the US was idyllic. But chasing good school districts with affordable housing left Tiffanie and her family constantly uprooted. As Tiffanie came of age in the suburbs, she began to ask questions about the binary Black and white American world. Why were the Black neighborhoods she lived in crime-ridden, and the multicultural ones safe? Why was it so hard for Black families to achieve stability? Ultimately, twenty-year old Tiffanie returns to Tobago. Black American Refugee examines in depth the intersection of her personal experiences and the broader culture and historical ramifications of American racism and global white supremacy.

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