New History Books: Wednesday, January 5

The Macedon Public Library is fully open for in-person visits. Computers are available and the Discovery Room is also open. Masks are required for all patrons, even if you have been vaccinated. We will continue to offer “Grab and Go” services for those who prefer to place their books on hold online and then pick them up in the cabinet outside the library.

Here are a few of the new books that have come in to the library recently. We invite you to check them out!

Image of item

Taking Paris: The Epic Battle For the City of Lights

May 1940: The world is stunned as Hitler’s forces invade France with a devastating blitzkrieg aimed at Paris. Within weeks, the City of Lights, revered for its carefree lifestyle, intellectual freedom, and love of liberty, has fallen under Nazi control. The players holding the fate of Paris in their hands are some of the biggest historical figures of the era: Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt, General George S. Patton, and the exiled French general Charles de Gaulle. From the fall of Paris in 1940 to the race for Paris in 1944, this riveting, page-turning drama unfolds through their decisions. Taking Paris is history told at a breathtaking pace, a sprawling yet intimate saga of heroism, desire, and personal sacrifice for all that is right.

Image of item

The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware

On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced annihilation. The fate of the Revolution rested heavily on the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side-by-side in one of the country’s first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution.

Image of item

Three Ordinary Girls: The Remarkable Story of Three Dutch Teenagers Who Became Spies, Saboteurs, Nazi Assassins — and WWII Heroes

Smart, fiercely political, devoted solely to the cause, and “with nothing to lose but their own lives,” Hannie Schaft and sisters Truus and Freddie Oversteegen took terrifying direct action against Nazi targets. That included sheltering fleeing Jews, political dissidents, and Dutch resisters. They sabotaged bridges and railways, and donned disguises to lead children from probable internment in concentration camps to safehouses. They covertly transported weapons and set military facilities ablaze. And they carried out the assassinations of German soldiers and traitors — on public streets and in private traps — with the courage of veteran guerrilla fighters and the cunning of seasoned spies.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s