New Non-Fiction: Thursday, Feb. 18

The library has moved to “Grab and Go” service in light of the recent spike of pandemic cases in Wayne County. What does that mean? Basically, the only ones allowed in the library at this time are staff members. To check out books, you’ll go to the online catalog and place holds on the books or other materials you want. Staff members will pull them and leave them in the cabinet outside the library doors. You can find more detailed instructions here.

Here are a few of the new books that have come in to the library recently. We invite you to check them out!

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Selling Your House: Nolo’s Essential Guide

Selling Your House: Nolo’s Essential Guide takes the reader through the entire home-selling process. This book discusses setting a price that will attract buyers, finding the right real estate agent, determining which repairs and upgrades pay off, making legally required disclosures to buyers, evaluating purchase offers, and negotiating and closing escrow successfully. This book also provides tips from industry pros — including real estate agents, attorneys, home stagers, and more — as well as stories from home sellers.

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Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America 1619-2019

A “choral history” of African Americans covering 400 years of history in the voices of 80 writers, edited by the bestselling, National Book Award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain. Last year marked the four hundredth anniversary of the first African presence in the Americas — and also launched the Four Hundred Souls project, spearheaded by Ibram X. Kendi, director of the Antiracism Institute of American University, and Keisha Blain, editor of The North Star. They’ve gathered together eighty black writers from all disciplines — historians and artists, journalists and novelists — each of whom has contributed an entry about one five-year period to create a dynamic multi-voiced single-volume history of black people in America.

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How Ike Led: The Principles Behing Eisenhower’s Biggest Decisions

How Dwight D. Eisenhower led America through a transformational time — by a DC policy strategist, security expert, and his granddaughter. From D-Day to Little Rock, from the Korean War to Cold War crises, from the Red Scare to the Missile Gap controversies, Ike was able to give our country eight years of peace and prosperity by relying on a core set of principles. These were informed by his heritage and upbringing, as well as his strong character and his personal discipline, but he also avoided making himself the center of things. He was a man of judgment, and steadying force. He sought national unity, by pursuing a course he called the “Middle Way” that tried to make winners on both sides of any issue. Ike was a strategic, not an operational leader, who relied on a rigorous pursuit of the facts for decision-making. His talent for envisioning a whole, especially in the context of the long game, and his ability to see causes and various consequences, explains his success as allied commander and as president. After making a decision, he made himself accountable for it, recognizing that personal responsibility is the bedrock of sound principles.

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