New Books: Wednesday, July 29

We are now open for limited visits by up to four patrons at a time.

Patrons wishing to browse the library’s collection of books and DVDs may come to the library and park in one of four, specially designated parking spots.  Only two people per vehicle will be permitted to enter the library at the same time. Each of the four parking spots will have a flip sign.  If more than one person enters from the same vehicle, they will be required to indicate two parking spaces are taken by flipping the signs located in front of two parking spots.  In spite of not occupying a space, cyclists and pedestrians will also need to flip a sign.  Flipping the signs will signal if maximum occupancy has been reached.

If all four parking spaces are filled upon arrival, the patron may choose to park in a non-designated space and wait for someone to exit the building.  This system will help to consistently keep the count of patrons in the library from exceeding the maximum, and will avoid the need for advance appointments.

Here are a few more of the new books that have arrived at the library since we closed due to the pandemic.

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Mrs. Lincoln’s Sisters

In May 1875, Elizabeth Todd Edwards reels from news that her younger sister Mary, former First Lady and widow of President Abraham Lincoln, has attempted suicide. Mary’s shocking act followed legal proceedings arranged by her eldest and only surviving son that declared her legally insane. Although they have long been estranged, Elizabeth knows Mary’s tenuous mental health has deteriorated through decades of trauma and loss. Yet is her suicide attempt truly the impulse of a deranged mind, or the desperate act of a sane woman terrified to be committed to an asylum? And—if her sisters can put past grievances aside—is their love powerful enough to save her? 

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Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars.

Night. Sleep. Death. The Stars is a gripping examination of contemporary America through the prism of a family tragedy: when a powerful parent dies, each of his adult children reacts in startling and unexpected ways, and his grieving widow in the most surprising way of all. Stark and penetrating, Joyce Carol Oates’s latest novel is a vivid exploration of race, psychological trauma, class warfare, grief, and eventual healing, as well as an intimate family novel in the tradition of the author’s bestselling We Were the Mulvaneys.

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Officer Clemmons: A Memoir

When he created the role of Officer Clemmons on the award-winning television series Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, François Clemmons made history as the first African American actor to have a recurring role on a children’s program. A new, wide world opened for Clemmons — but one that also required him to make painful personal choices and sacrifices. Officer Clemmons details Clemmons’s incredible life story, beginning with his early years in Alabama and Ohio, marked by family trauma and loss, through his studies as a music major at Oberlin College, where Clemmons began to investigate and embrace his homosexuality, to a chance encounter with Fred Rogers that changed the whole course of both men’s lives, leading to a deep, spiritual friendship and mentorship spanning nearly forty years. From New York to Russia, Berlin to California, Grammy Award-winner Clemmons has performed for audiences around the world and remains a beloved figure. Evocative and intimate, and buoyed by its author’s own vivacious, inimitable energy, Officer Clemmons chronicles a historical and enlightening life and career of a man who has brought joy to millions of adults and children, across generations and borders.

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