New Youth Book Recommendation

Today we start a new phase of library operations as curbside delivery goes into effect. That means you can now order books to be pulled for you, and we’ll check them out to you and even bring them right out to your car. At this point, we’re only working with books in our own Macedon Library–the hold system that allows you to get books from other libraries isn’t back up yet. But still: we have piles of brand new books available, and it’s not hard to use the form to order them.

If you’d like to see what’s new, here’s a page that shows everything that’s come in since we closed for the pandemic. You can check and see if the books are available here. You can order the books you want here. You’ll find directions on what you need to do on these pages–it’s not hard!


Here are three of the new books for young people that are currently available for curbside delivery:

Again Again

f you could live your life again, what would you do differently?

After a near-fatal family catastrophe and an unexpected romantic upheaval, Adelaide Buchwald finds herself catapulted into a summer of wild possibility, during which she will fall in and out of love a thousand times–while finally confronting the secrets she keeps, her ideas about love, and the weird grandiosity of the human mind.

A raw, funny story that will surprise you over and over, Again Again gives us an indelible heroine grappling with the terrible and wonderful problem of loving other people.

Star Wars Jedi Academy: At Last, Jedi

The epic conclusion to the Starspeeder saga in this 9th volume of Jedi Academy by Jarrett Krosoczka and Amy Ignatow! As told through a mix of comics, doodles, and journal entries, Christina Starspeeder takes us on a new adventure at the advanced Jedi Academy campus! There are unfamiliar faces and old ones too, but one thing remains the same: Jedi Academy is full of laughs and warm moments that fans and readers discovering the series for the first time will love.

Banned Book Club

The autobiography of a South Korean woman’s student days under an authoritarian regime, and how she defied state censorship. When Kim Hyun Sook started college in 1983 she was ready for her world to open up. After acing her exams and sort-of convincing her traditional mother that it was a good idea for a woman to go to college, she looked forward to soaking up the ideas of Western Literature far from the drudgery she was promised at her family’s restaurant. But literature class would prove to be just the start of a massive turning point, still focused on reading but with life-or-death stakes she never could have imagined. This was during South Korea’s Fifth Republic, a military regime that entrenched its power through censorship, torture, and the murder of protestors. In this charged political climate, with Molotov cocktails flying and fellow students disappearing for hours and returning with bruises, Hyun Sook sought refuge in the comfort of books. When the handsome young editor of the school newspaper invited her to his reading group, she expected to pop into the cafeteria to talk about Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Scarlet Letter. Instead she found herself hiding in a basement as the youngest member of an underground banned book club. 

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