New Books for Children: Monday, August 22

The Macedon Public Library is fully open for in-person visits. Computers are available and the Discovery Room is also open. Masks are strongly encouraged for all patrons, even if you have been vaccinated. We will continue to offer “Grab and Go” services for those who prefer to place their books on hold online and then pick them up in the cabinet outside the library.

Here are a few of the new books for children that have come to the library recently. We invite you to check them out!

Cat

See a jaguar swimming, a cat that can outrun a car, a leopard who lost his spots, and a black panther stalking its prey. Learn why cats need whiskers, how they purr, how the Manx cat lost its tail, and why a tiger is striped. Discover how cats communicate, how cats find their way home, why the black cat has been both persecuted and pampered, why they are said to have nine lives, and more. From domestic cats to the beasts prowling in the wild, Eyewitness: Cat looks at these beautiful mammals that are a part of our world. 8-12 years.

Minecraft: Zombies!

Life is good for Bobbie in the sleepy village of Plaintown. Sure, her villager parents only ever say “Hrm,” but you pick up the local language quickly. And maybe her little brother, Johnny, is always getting into trouble, but the village’s iron golem is there to look out for him. But one night, a stranger comes to Plaintown—and he’s followed by a horde of ravenous zombies! Bobbie’s village is overrun, and her world is turned upside down as her friends, family, and neighbors fall victim to the zombies’ endless appetite. 10-12 years.

Hope is an Arrow: The Story of Lebanese American Poet Kahlil Gibran

Before Kahlil Gibran became the world’s third-best-selling poet of all time, he was Gibran Khalil Gibran, an immigrant child from Lebanon with a secret hope to bring people together despite their many differences. Kahlil’s life highlights the turn of the twentieth century, from the religious conflicts that tore apart his homeland and sent a hundred thousand Arab people to America, to settling in Boston, where the wealthy clashed headlong with the poor. Throughout it all, Kahlil held on to his secret hope, even as his identity grew roots on both sides of the Atlantic. More than a hundred years later, his words still fly around the world in many languages, bringing people together. 6-9 years.


 

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