New Non-Fiction: Friday, October 8

The Macedon Public Library is fully open for in-person visits. Computers are available and the Discovery Room is also open. Masks are strongly encouraged for all patrons, even if you have been vaccinated. We will continue to offer “Grab and Go” services for those who prefer to place their books on hold online and then pick them up in the cabinet outside the library.

Here are a few of the new books that have come in to the library recently. We invite you to check them out!

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Please Don’t Sit On My Bed In Your Outside Clothes: Essays

New York Times bestselling author, comedian, actress, and producer Phoebe Robinson is back with a new essay collection that is equal parts thoughtful, hilarious, and sharp about human connection, race, hair, travel, dating, Black excellence, and more. Written in Phoebe’s unforgettable voice and with her unparalleled wit, Robinson’s latest collection, laced with spot-on pop culture references, takes on a wide range of topics. From the values she learned from her parents to her and her boyfriend deciding to have a child-free union, each essay is packed with humor and humanity.

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Voice From the Pandemic: Americans Tell Their Stories of Crisis, Courage, and Resilience

The Covid-19 pandemic was a world-shattering event, affecting everyone in the nation. From its first ominous stirrings, renowned journalist Eli Saslow began interviewing a cross-section of Americans, capturing their experiences in real time. Through Saslow’s masterful, empathetic interviewing, we are given a kaleidoscopic picture of a people dealing with the unimaginable. These deeply personal accounts make for cathartic reading, as we see Americans at their worst, and at their resilient best.

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The Rage of Innocence: How America Criminalizes Black Youth

Drawing upon 25 years of experience representing black youth in Washington D.C.’s juvenile court, Kris Henning confronts America’s irrational, manufactured fears of Black youth and makes a powerfully compelling case that the crisis in racist American policing begins with its relationship to Black children. She explains how discriminatory and aggressive policing has socialized a generation of Black teenagers to fear, resent, and resist the police. She makes clear that unlike white youth who are afforded the freedom to test boundaries, experiment with sex and drugs, and figure out who they are and want to be, Black youth are seen as a threat to white America and are denied healthy adolescent development.  

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