New Fiction: Monday, September 13

The Macedon Public Library is fully open for in-person visits. Computers are available and the Discovery Room is also open. Masks are strongly encouraged for all patrons, even if you have been vaccinated. We will continue to offer “Grab and Go” services for those who prefer to place their books on hold online and then pick them up in the cabinet outside the library.

Here are a few of the new books that have come in to the library recently. We invite you to check them out!

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You Can Run

Nothing gets by Jill Bailey. As a CIA analyst, she’s in charge of investigating and vetting new sources like FALCON. He says he’s a Syrian defense official attached to a covert biowarfare program — and with a global pandemic fresh in their minds, CIA officials are desperate to use him. It’s Jill’s job to make sure he is who he claims to be, and that his case officers in the field haven’t been duped — or coerced. But before she can get to work, she gets a call: We have your son. Alex Charles, a journalist eager to break the next big story, begins to investigate an anonymous tip: an explosive claim about the CIA’s hottest new source. The tip — and a fierce determination to find the truth — leads Alex to Jill. As the two begin to work together, they uncover a vast conspiracy that will force them to confront their loyalties to family and country.

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What the Cat Dragged In

Librarian Charlie Harris and his faithful feline companion, Diesel, have inherited Charlie’s grandfather’s house, along with a deadly legacy: a decades-old crime scene. As he and Diesel check out the house he remembers fondly from his childhood, he is pleasantly surprised that it is in better condition than expected. That is, until they find a literal skeleton in a closet. While the sheriff’s department investigates the mysterious remains, Charlie digs deeper into the past for clues to the identity of the bones and why they are there. As Charlie delves into his own family history, he encounters many people who might have been motivated to take a life. But Charlie and Diesel know that things are not always what they seem, and that secrets seemingly lost to time have a way of finding their way back to haunt the present.

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The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois

The great scholar, W. E. B. Du Bois, once wrote about the problem of race in America, and what he called “Double Consciousness,” a sensitivity that every African American possesses in order to survive. Since childhood, Ailey Pearl Garfield has understood Du Bois’s words all too well. Bearing the names of two formidable Black Americans — the revered choreographer Alvin Ailey and her great grandmother Pearl, the descendant of enslaved Georgians and tenant farmers — Ailey carries Du Bois’s problem on her shoulders. To come to terms with her own identity, Ailey embarks on a journey through her family’s past, uncovering the shocking tales of generations of ancestors — Indigenous, Black, and white — in the deep South. In doing so Ailey must learn to embrace her full heritage, a legacy of oppression and resistance, bondage and independence, cruelty and resilience that is the story — and the song — of America itself.

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