New Books: Tuesday, October 27

The library is now open for limited patron access. We are allowing seven patrons at a time in the library. There is hand sanitizer on the table by the circulation desk; we ask you to use it when you come in. It is once again possible to place holds on items from other libraries, although there are only limited runs being made between the libraries, so it may take longer than formerly for your items to arrive. Thank you for your help as we work to make the library a safe place for all!

Here are a few more of the new books we’ve received lately:

Image of item

Long-Term Care: How to Plan & Pay For It

Get the best care, in the right place, at the right price. To find the right kind of long-term care, you may need to make difficult personal, medical, and financial decisions during emotionally tough times. Long-Term Care helps you and your family understand the range of available choices. Even more important, it guides you toward the best care you can afford. You’ll learn how to:

  • explore your options for home care, assisted living, and nursing homes
  • get the most out of Medicaid, Medicare, and veterans’ programs
  • evaluate whether long-term care insurance is worth the significant expense
  • consider the special needs of loved ones with dementia or Alzheimer’s, and
  • protect your loved ones from elder fraud.
Image of item

The Meaning of Mariah Carey

“It took me a lifetime to have the courage and the clarity to write my memoir. I want to tell the story of the moments — the ups and downs, the triumphs and traumas, the debacles and the dreams — that contributed to the person I am today. Though there have been countless stories about me throughout my career and very public personal life, it’s been impossible to communicate the complexities and depths of my experience in any single magazine article or a 10-minute television interview. And even then, my words were filtered through someone else’s lens, largely satisfying someone else’s assignment to define me.  This book is composed of my memories, my mishaps, my struggles, my survival, and my songs. Unfiltered. I went deep into my childhood and gave the scared little girl inside of me a big voice. I let the abandoned and ambitious adolescent have her say, and the betrayed and triumphant woman I became tell her side.” 

Image of item

The Man Who Ran Washington

This is a biography any would-be power broker must own: the story of legendary White House chief of staff and secretary of state James A. Baker III. In the latter half of the twentieth century, no Republican won the presidency without his help, and the men he counseled in the Oval Office — Gerald R. Ford, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush — defined more than one generation of American life. Campaign manager, chief of staff, treasury secretary, and ultimately secretary of state, James A. Baker III understood better than anyone how to make Washington work and how to pull the levers of power at home and abroad. His first dramatic win was in 1976 as the delegate hunter who secured the Republican nomination for Ford against a challenge from Ronald Reagan. His next job, as Bush’s campaign manager four years later, maneuvered Bush onto the ticket with Reagan and Baker into the most powerful office in Washington other than the Oval Office: White House chief of staff. In his years in the White House and in the cabinet, Baker was the avatar of a style of politics and governance that valued pragmatism and deal making over purity. He went from win to win — reforming the tax code, negotiating the first Middle East peace talks, managing the dissolution of the Soviet Union — until his capstone victory, as field marshal for the younger Bush’s Florida recount battle, helped divide the country forever.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s