New Books: Wednesday, September 16

The library is now open for limited patron access. There are four marked parking spaces outside; please park in one of these if you’d like to come in to browse. If all four spaces are full, please wait until one becomes available, in order to allow us to keep safe social distances inside. There is also a space designated for curbside book delivery, and another for anyone who needs to use a computer. Please use these spaces as appropriate, or wait in another spot until one becomes available. Thank you for your help as we work to make the library a safe place for all!

Here are a few more of the new books we’ve gotten in recently:

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101 Law Forms for Personal Use

Reliable legal forms for common personal and family transactions. At one time or another, we all need to get an agreement in writing. But where to start? 101 Law Forms for Personal Use makes it easy to create legal agreements and organize essential information. The plain-English instructions will help you:

Plan your estate: Make a simple will and use worksheets to track beneficiaries and assets.

Delegate authority: Create temporary guardianship of a child, pet care agreements, limited powers of attorney, and other essential documents.

Rent out a place to live: Use the rental application, move-in letter, checklist, notice of needed repairs, and other forms.

Buy a house: Run the numbers with a financial statement, and then use the house comparison worksheet, moving checklist, and other forms.

Borrow or lend money: Prepare a solid legal contract (promissory note). Included are five forms―one for every common borrowing/lending situation.

Sell personal property: All the agreements you need to sell a motor vehicle, boat, or other valuable property.

With Downloadable Forms: you can download and customize all of the agreements, checklists, and other forms in this book (details inside).

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Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit (large print edition)

In RUST, Eliese brings the reader inside the belly of the mill and the middle American upbringing that brought her there in the first place. She takes a long and intimate look at her Rust Belt childhood and struggles to reconcile her desire to leave without turning her back on the people she’s come to love: the people she sees as the unsung backbone of our nation. Faced with the financial promise of a steelworker’s paycheck, and the very real danger of working in an environment where a steel coil could crush you at any moment or a vat of molten iron could explode because of a single drop of water, Eliese finds unexpected warmth and camaraderie among the gruff men she labors beside each day.

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A Honeybee Heart Has Five Openings: A Year of Keeping Bees

A Honeybee Heart Has Five Openings begins as the author is entering her thirties and feeling disconnected in her life. Uneasy about her future and struggling to settle into her new house in Oxford with its own small garden, she is brought back to a time of accompanying a friend in London — a beekeeper — on his hive visits. And as a gesture of good fortune for her new life, she is given a colony of honeybees. According to folklore, a colony, freely given, brings good luck, and Helen Jules embarks on a rewarding, perilous journey of becoming a beekeeper. Jukes writes about what it means to “keep” wild creatures; on how to live alongside beings whose laws and logic are so different from our own . . . She delves into the history of beekeeping and writes about discovering the ancient, haunting, sometimes disturbing relationship between keeper and bee, human and wild thing.

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