New Books: Tuesday, September 8

Happy Labor Day! The library is now open for limited patron access. There are four marked parking spaces outside; please park in one of these if you’d like to come in to browse. If all four spaces are full, please wait until one becomes available, in order to allow us to keep safe social distances inside. There is also a space designated for curbside book delivery, and another for anyone who needs to use a computer. Please use these spaces as appropriate, or wait in another spot until one becomes available. Thank you for your help as we work to make the library a safe place for all!

Here are a few more of the new books we’ve gotten in since we closed for the pandemic:

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The Living Dead: A New Novel

George A. Romero invented the modern zombie with Night of the Living Dead, creating a monster that has become a key part of pop culture. Romero often felt hemmed in by the constraints of film-making. To tell the story of the rise of the zombies and the fall of humanity the way it should be told, Romero turned to fiction. Unfortunately, when he died, the story was incomplete. But now, set in the present day, The Living Dead is an entirely new tale, the story of the zombie plague as George A. Romero wanted to tell it. A pair of medical examiners find themselves battling a dead man who won’t stay dead. In a Midwestern trailer park, a Black teenage girl and a Muslim immigrant battle newly-risen friends and family. On a U.S. aircraft carrier, living sailors hide from dead ones while a fanatic makes a new religion out of death. At a cable news station, a surviving anchor keeps broadcasting while his undead colleagues try to devour him. In D.C., an autistic federal employee charts the outbreak, preserving data for a future that may never come.

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Harrow the Ninth

She answered the Emperor’s call. She arrived with her arts, her wits, and her only friend. In victory, her world has turned to ash. Nothing is as it seems in the halls of the Emperor, and the fate of the galaxy rests on one woman’s shoulders. Harrowhark Nonagesimus, last necromancer of the Ninth House, has been drafted by her Emperor to fight an unwinnable war. Side-by-side with a detested rival, Harrow must perfect her skills and become an angel of undeath — but her health is failing, her sword makes her nauseous, and even her mind is threatening to betray her. Sealed in the gothic gloom of the Emperor’s Mithraeum with three unfriendly teachers, hunted by the mad ghost of a murdered planet, Harrow must confront two unwelcome questions: is somebody trying to kill her? And if they succeeded, would the universe be better off?

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The Grove of the Caesars

In the sacred grove of Julius Caesar, something deadly stirs in the undergrowth — a serial killer, who haunted the gardens for years, has claimed another victim — in Lindsey Davis’s historical mystery, The Grove of the Caesars. At the feet of her adoptive father, renowned private informer Marcus Didius Falco, Flavia Albia learned a number of important rules. First and foremost: always keep one’s distance from the palace; nothing good comes from that direction. But right behind it: murder is the business of the Vigiles; best to leave them to it. Having broken the first rule more often than she’d like, it’s no surprise to anyone when she finds herself breaking the second one. The public gardens named after the Caesars are a place nice girls are warned away from and when a series of bodies are uncovered, it’s clear that a serial killer has been haunting the grove for years. The case is assigned to one Julius Karus, a cohort of the Vigiles, but Albia is convinced that nothing will come of his efforts. Out of sympathy for the dead women and their grieving relatives, Albia decides to work with the vile Karus and bring the serial killer to justice.

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